Exhibit Area 1
(Plaza area)
Welcome Sign [main directory]
How the Bridge Spans the Golden Gate
Bridge Aesthetics - Art Deco on a Grand Scale
Tall and Strong - The Bridge Towers
Steel, Fog, Salt, Rust, and Paint

Exhibit Area 2
(near flagpole)
How the Bridge Vibrates
Foghorns

Exhibit Area 3
(West side of Bridge near underpass)
Historic Preservation: Lattice Strut Retrofit
Historic Preservation: Isolator Seismic Retrofit

Exhibit Area 4
(inside Battery area)
History: Design and Construction of the Bridge
Suspension Cable Tension vs. Tower Height
Battery Lancaster - Defending the Golden Gate

Exhibit Area 5
(along bike path to lower parking lot)
Bridge Deck Aerodynamics
Bridge Deck Torsional Resistance Retrofit
Wind Speed and Wind Pressure

Exhibit Area 6
(near Pavillion)
LIFETILES: animated construction of the Bridge
Braille / Tactile Model of the Bridge



Project Partners

GGBHTD
Golden Gate Bridge,
Highway and Transporation District



CUREE

Consortium of Universities for Research
in Earthquake Engineering

Main Menu : Exhibit Area 1

Bridge Aesthetics - Art Deco on a Grand Scale

The Golden Gate Bridge is one of the world’s largest examples of the Art Deco style.

Named for the Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, held in Paris in 1925, the Art Deco style was used by architect Irving Morrow to add aesthetic touches throughout the Bridge. These include chevron or beveled shapes and an expression of verticality.

More Images

View looking up at the tower.

The chevron design and the angular, stepped brackets on the horizontal struts of the Bridge are nonstructural, added for visual effect.

Lights that point down are street lights for Highway 101 traffic crossing the Bridge. The round lights pointing up emphasize the height of the towers at night, an up-lighting technique often used on Art Deco skyscrapers of the 1930s, such as the Empire State Building.

The concrete pylons at the ends of the arch portion of the Bridge have a chevron form in both plan and elevation. Their tops are another Art Deco feature: they do not meet the sky as a squared off shape like a flat roof but rather with staggered vertical forms.

A hidden Art Deco gem at the Marin (north) side of the Bridge, viewed from Battery Spencer.

The concrete at the base of the south tower also received an Art Deco treatment.
All images property of the Golden Gate Bridge, Highway and Transportation District (unless otherwise indicated).

For more information -

Art Deco Style
http://goldengatebridge.org/research/documents/art_decoGGB.pdf

Art Deco Theme
http://goldengatebridge.org/research/factsGGBArtDeco.php


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Last updated: 11.08.12